All Posts by Julian Northbrook

About the Author

Julian Northbrook is an unconventional punk of the business English learning world. A leading expert in English education and direct response marketing, he’s fully equipped to drag you kicking and screaming from English-mediocracy to speaking at an outstanding level. After being turned down for his dream job in the art industry, Julian suffered three long years as a crap Japanese speaker. He understands exactly what it’s like to feel like a total idiot every time you speak. But Julian overcame his language problems, mastered the language, and went on to work first as a freelance translator, then as an executive member of a Japanese company. But he soon grew sick of the corporate world and left it to pursue something infinitely more satisfying — running his own business helping small business owners and entrepreneurs get so good at English that they forget that it’s not their first language. He writes the infamous Doing English Daily Newsletter which you can (and should) subscribe to.

BS1E1: Turned out Nice Again….

By Julian Northbrook

Welcome to British Stories Lesson 1. British visitors are coming to have a look around your office – what are you going to say to them? How are you going to make small talk? Luckily your English friend, Alison, is on hand to give you a few pointers. This lesson is an “onboarding” lesson. What […]

Continue reading

Ireland, Abortion and my Take on Religion

By Julian Northbrook

Three years ago Ireland voted “Yes” for same-sex marriage. And yesterday they voted “Yes” to allow safe and legal abortions. This is a big deal. Though frankly, it’s backwards and medieval that this vote was even necessary. Nobody—nobody—has the right to tell anyone what they can and can’t do with their own bodies. Especially not […]

Continue reading

Where does the word “English” come from?

By Julian Northbrook

Do you ever wonder about the origins of words? That is, their etymology. Recently I was in Manila. The major language of the Philippines is Tagalog, which apparently comes form the word “tagá-ilog” — or “people of the river”. Which got me interested… Where does “English” come from? Logically you’d think it comes from the […]

Continue reading
1 2
>